inkmusings is now permanently archived. I will leave it on the server showing a random post on the home page (refresh to see a different random post). You can follow my adventures of the writing life at my active site, garyvarner.com.

Wee Folk

On a recent day trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan, we fully expected to soak in the local culture of this famed college town. In addition to having a great assortment of book stores (and the largest Borders store I’ve ever seen), the locals seem to look the other way on graffiti artists and would-be creative types. But we had heard there was a completely different culture available in this liberal corner of the Midwest.

Lori hoping to catch a wee glimpse...

Close-up of above doorApparently a small society of fairies has decided that Ann Arbor is a nice place to live, and so have settled in among the big people. A great mystery surrounds when they first appeared, and although no one is talking, I suspect whoever knows the truth is sworn to secrecy by some wee-big folks accord. And although I can’t share pictures of the actual cuties (maybe after a few beers…), I can provide the evidence of their domiciles we snapped while strolling the streets. Even though we were following a map, when we discovered each door there was always a bit of a surprise at their dimunitive stature. I’ll hush now and let you enjoy these images, but if you want to find out more about the fairy doors of Ann Arbor, go here, NPR’s coverage, and The Washington Post’s article.

High window

The door to the stairs to the window...

A sense of scale

Two more doors

2 comments to Wee Folk

  • Gary, nice shots! I like the little accountrements placed just outside of the doors – a logbook here, a chair there…wonder how that got started.

  • Brian

    Hi. Arrived here after reading Lori’s post on your trip to Ann Arbor. Isn’t that one great Borders? I’ve spent some time there just browsing (bookstores being one of my addictions). Thanks for the pictures of the faerie abodes. Too bad you didn’t capture one of the wee folk on film.